Diagnostic Breast Ultrasound

Diagnostic ultrasounds are ordered by a doctor when a patient is having issues such as pain, nipple discharge or has discovered a lump.

At Arizona Breastnet,  we understand how stressful waiting can be.  In most cases, we can schedule your diagnostic appointment the next business day, and often times the same day!  In addition, one of our expert radiologists will review the findings, sit down with and go over those findings with you at the time of appointment.

 

A breast ultrasound uses sound waves to make a picture of the tissues inside the breast. A breast ultrasound can show all areas of the breast, including the area closest to the chest wall, which is hard to study with a mammogram. Breast ultrasound does not use X-rays or other potentially harmful types of radiation.


A breast ultrasound is used to see whether a breast lump is filled with fluid (a cyst) or if it is a solid lump. An ultrasound does not replace the need for a mammogram, but it is often used to check abnormal results from a mammogram.


For a breast ultrasound, a small handheld unit called a transducercamera.gif is gently passed back and forth over the breast. A computer turns the sound waves into a picture on a TV screen. The picture is called a sonogram or ultrasound scan.


Why It Is Done?
Breast ultrasound can add important information to the results of other tests, such as a mammogram or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also may provide information that is not found with a mammogram. A breast ultrasound may be done to:

  • Find the cause of breast symptoms, such as pain, swelling, and redness.

  • Check a breast lump found on breast self-examination or physical examination. It is used to see whether a breast lump is fluid-filled (a cyst) or if it is a solid lump. A lump that has no fluid or that has fluid with floating particles may need more tests.

  • Check abnormal results from a mammogram.

  • Look at the breasts in younger women because their breast tissue is often more dense, and a mammogram may not show as much detail.

  • Guide the placement of a needle or other tube to drain a collection of fluid (cyst) or pus (abscess), take a sample of breast tissue (biopsy), or guide breast surgery.

  • Watch for changes in the size of a cyst or a noncancerous lump (fibroadenoma).

  • See how far cancer has spread in a breast.

  • Check your breasts if you have silicone breast implants or dense breasts. In these situations, a mammogram may not be able to see breast lumps.​

 

From WebMD

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